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CANCELED: Outdoor Meet & Greet with Lenard Moore and Earl Braggs

This event has been canceled due to scheduling conflicts. We hope to reschedule in the future.

LENARD MOORE,Long Rain: Poetry

A book of exquisite tanka poems, similar to haiku, and short prose haibun, organized around the elements: Earth, Wind, Fire, Water. Yes, these poems capture a series of detailed moments, primarily set in the American South, but they also employ an energetic fragmentary language to express the flow of experience in a way that gives the book a surprising sense of movement.

"Lenard D. Moore’s poems are intimate, sensuous, transporting you to the moment, making you a willing voyeur. The landscape of the south sprinkled with its people is stark and sensual, taste the apple, feel the rain on your eyelid, walk into this journey. These are delicious poems you will read over and over again, each time experiencing new vibrations."
—Opal Palmer Adisa

Lenard D. Moore is an internationally acclaimed poet and anthologist. His literary works have been published in more than sixteen countries and translated into more than twelve languages. His poems, essays, short stories and book reviews have appeared in many publications and anthologies. Moore is the author of The Geography Of Jazz, A Temple Looming, Desert Storm: A Brief History, Forever Home, and The Open Eye among other books. He is the editor of All The Songs We Sing; One Window's Light: A Collection of Haiku, (winner of the Haiku Society of America 2018 Merit Book Award). He has taught Creative Writing and African American Literature and has collaborated with poets, visual artists, musicians and dancers on several projects. He is the founder and executive director of the Carolina African American Writers' Collective and co-founder of the Washington Street Writers Group. He also is the longtime Executive Chairman of the North Carolina Haiku Society. He was the First African American President of the Haiku Society of America. And he is a U.S. Army veteran. Among his numerous awards are the North Carolina Award for Literature, Furious Flower Laureate Ring, Haiku Museum of Tokyo Award, Margaret Walker Creative Writing Award, Indies Arts Award, Cave Canem Fellowships, and a Soul Mountain Retreat Fellowship. He earned his Master of Arts in English and African American Literature from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University and his Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies with a minor in English (Magna Cum Laude) from Shaw University.


EARL S. BRAGGS, A Boy Named Boy: Growing Up Black in “Whitetown” During the 1960s, Hampstead, NC

At the intersection of black and white, fish and snakes, rural and city, poor and more poor, public and private, A Boy Named Boy names what it means to live out loud, Black, shamelessly declaring restorative witness as an act of resistance and the unflinching utterance of endurance. This memoir of race and survival croons and scrutinizes a sultry but sharp southern manner.
—Jaki Shelton Green, North Carolina Poet Laureate and author of Feeding the Light

“People have long told stories like our story but most never quite as long.”

And so begins Earl S. Braggs’ complex jazz memoir of growing up black and poor in rural North Carolina. What is long about Braggs’ story is not its length but how deeply the roots of race and history reach through the narrative in every unexpected direction. From the haphazard pleasures of a childhood in a rural shack in segregated “fishtown” to the civil unrest of Wilmington NC in the Civil Rights Era to the poet’s coming of age as a writer in San Francisco. In the midst of familiar injustices, Braggs blows open our conceptions about good and bad, revealing violence where we expect safety and friendships where we expect derision. A white man presses a revolver into the boy’s head, the bookmobile lady stops so he can get on. While the borders of Hampstead were segregated black and white, the design of this narrative never is.

A North Carolina native from the rural-back-woods-fishing community of Hampstead, Earl Sherman Braggs is a UC Foundation and Battle Professor of English at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Braggs is the author of thirteen collections of poetry. Hat Dancing with Miss Bessie Smith and Negro Side of the Moon are his latest. Among his many awards are the Anhinga Poetry Prize, the Cleveland (Ohio) State Poetry Prize (unable to accept, manuscript won in two places at the same time), the C&R Poetry Prize, the Jack Kerouac International Literary Prize, the Knoxville News Sentinel Poetry Award and the Gloucester County Poetry Prize. Braggs’ novel, Looking for Jack Kerouac was a finalist for the James Jones First Novel Contest. Cruising Weather Wind Blue is forthcoming from Anhinga press. Obama’s Children is forthcoming from Madville Press.

Event date: 
Saturday, September 25, 2021 - 2:00pm to 3:00pm
Event address: 
North Hills
4209-100 Lassiter Mill Road
Raleigh, NC 27609
Pre-Order Now Badge
Long Rain Cover Image
By Lenard D. Moore, Guy Davenport (Introduction by)
$16.00
ISBN: 9781732436992
Availability: Coming soon - PRE-ORDER NOW!
Published: Wet Cement Press - November 15th, 2021

Long Rain is an exquisite collection of five line poems (tanka) and short prose (haibun), organized around the elements: Earth, Wind, Fire and Water.


A Boy Named Boy: Growing Up Black in Whitetown During the 1960s, Hampstead, NC Cover Image
$16.00
ISBN: 9781732436985
Availability: On our shelves
Published: Wet Cement Press - March 25th, 2021

"People have long told stories like our story but most never quite as long." And so begins Earl S. Braggs complex jazz memoir of growing up black and poor in rural North Carolina. What is long about Braggs' story is not its length but how deeply the roots of race and history reach through the narrative in every unexpected direction.