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William A. Darity and A. Kirsten Mullen - 'From Here to Equality' (online)

This event will be held virtually!

Racism and discrimination have choked economic opportunity for African Americans at nearly every turn. At several historic moments, the trajectory of racial inequality could have been altered dramatically. Perhaps no moment was more opportune than the early days of Reconstruction, when the U.S. government temporarily implemented a major redistribution of land from former slaveholders to the newly emancipated enslaved. But neither Reconstruction nor the New Deal nor the civil rights struggle led to an economically just and fair nation. The authors confront these injustices head-on and make the most comprehensive case to date for economic reparations for U.S. descendants of slavery. 

William A. Darity Jr. is the Samuel DuBois Cook Professor of Public Policy, African and African American Studies, and Economics at Duke University. A. Kirsten Mullen is a writer, folklorist, museum consultant, and lecturer whose work focuses on race, art, history, and politics.

Darity and Mullen will be in conversation with Adriane Lentz-Smith, Associate Professor and Associate Chair in Duke's department of History, where she teaches courses on the Civil Rights Movement, Black Lives, Modern America, and History in Fact and Fiction.

 

Signed bookplates will be available with purchase of From Here to Equality from QRB.

Event date: 
Sunday, July 12, 2020 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Event address: 
North Hills
4209-100 Lassiter Mill Road
Raleigh, NC 27609
From Here to Equality: Reparations for Black Americans in the Twenty-First Century Cover Image
$28.00
ISBN: 9781469654973
Availability: On our shelves now
Published: University of North Carolina Press - April 20th, 2020

Racism and discrimination have choked economic opportunity for African Americans at nearly every turn. At several historic moments, the trajectory of racial inequality could have been altered dramatically. Perhaps no moment was more opportune than the early days of Reconstruction, when the U.S.