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Alex Ross | 'Wagnerism' (online)

This event will be hosted via Zoom Webinar.

In conversation with Bob Chapman, host of WCPE's Thursday Night Opera House and Thursday night host of Music in the Night.

Alex Ross reveals how Richard Wagner became the proving ground for modern art and politics—an aesthetic war zone where the Western world wrestled with its capacity for beauty and violence. Ross restores the magnificent confusion of what it means to be a Wagnerian. A pandemonium of geniuses, madmen, charlatans, and prophets do battle over Wagner’s many-sided legacy, as Ross ranges thrillingly across artistic disciplines, investigating Wagner's influence on everything from the architecture of Louis Sullivan to the novels of Philip K. Dick, from the Zionist writings of Theodor Herzl to the civil-rights essays of W.E.B. Du Bois, from O Pioneers! to Apocalypse NowWagnerism is a work of passionate discovery, urging us toward a more honest idea of how art acts in the world.

Alex Ross has been the music critic for The New Yorker since 1996. His first book, the international bestseller The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century, was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and won a National Book Critics Circle Award. His second book, the essay collection Listen to This, received an ASCAP Deems Taylor Award. He was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2008 and a Guggenheim Fellow in 2015.

This event is co-sponsored by the Triangle Wagner Society.

Event date: 
Sunday, November 15, 2020 - 2:00pm to 3:00pm
Event address: 
North Hills
4209-100 Lassiter Mill Road
Raleigh, NC 27609
Wagnerism: Art and Politics in the Shadow of Music Cover Image
$40.00
ISBN: 9780374285937
Availability: On our shelves now
Published: Farrar, Straus and Giroux - September 15th, 2020

Alex Ross, renowned New Yorker music critic and author of the international bestseller and Pulitzer Prize finalist The Rest Is Noise, reveals how Richard Wagner became the proving ground for modern art and politics—an aesthetic war zone where the Western world wrestled with its capacity for beauty and violence.